Progress Turnverein (Riverside, N.J.) records

In Germany in 1811, Freidrich Jahn established the first Turnverein movement that advocated strengthening one’s mind and body through gymnastics instruction. He believed that the discipline that young German men achieved at the Turnvereins would aid them in their opposition to the oppressive rule o...

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Bibliographic Details
Main Author: Progress Turnverein (Riverside, N.J.) (Creator)
Collection:Progress Turnverein (Riverside, N.J.) Records
Collection Number:3057
Format: Manuscript
Language:English
Online Access:Link to finding aid
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Item Description: A full English translation of Volume 1, Minute Book, 1860-1875, is available in the library.
Physical Description: 0.4 Linear feet 1 box, 3 volumes
Summary: In Germany in 1811, Freidrich Jahn established the first Turnverein movement that advocated strengthening one’s mind and body through gymnastics instruction. He believed that the discipline that young German men achieved at the Turnvereins would aid them in their opposition to the oppressive rule of the French. When the government restrictions were placed on the Turnvereins, followers fled to America around the middle of the nineteenth century seeking freedom from oppression. These refugees established the American Turnerverein movement and eventually, most of the major American cities were homes to Turnvereins. The Progress Turnverein was founded in 1860 and perptuated the teachings of Jahn by offering gymnastics instruction. It was renamed the Riverside Turnverein, but soon ended in 1875. Another group appears around 1897 named the Riverside Turners. This group may be the same Turnverein from 1860, just reborn or the Riverside Turners may be a group distantly related to the Progress Turnverein. The Progress Turnverein Records consists of a minute book, ledger, receipt book, financial papers, Philadelphia Turnbezirks convention records, and some miscellaneous papers, all of which relate directly to the Turverein. Issues of Topics, the official publication of the American Turners, an American Turners embroidered patch, six postcards, and a memo from the secretary of the American Turners also appear in this collection. This last group of materials does not have an obvious connection to the Progress Turnverein. The records span from 1860 to 1976 and a gap in the records occurs between 1875 and 1972.