Parrish and Pemberton families papers

The Parrish and Pemberton families were wealthy Quaker merchants living in Philadelphia during the 18th century. They shared a dedication to several benevolent causes, among them the abolition of slavery, improvement of relations with the Indians, penal reform, and the poor. This collection contai...

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Main Authors: Parrish family (Creator), Pemberton family (Creator)
Collection:Parrish and Pemberton Families Papers
Collection Number:1653
Format: Manuscript
Language:English
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Online Access:Link to finding aid
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LEADER 13927ntc a2200517 u 4500
001 ead-1653
008 160715i xx eng d
040 |e dacs 
041 0 |a eng 
099 |a 1653 
100 3 |a Parrish family  |e creator 
245 1 |a Parrish and Pemberton families papers  |f 1614-1880 
300 |a 1.0 Linear feet  |f ; 2 boxes, 3 volumes, 1 flat file 
500 |a Processing Information: Collection was rehoused in acid-free folders in the order found. 
506 |a Open to researchers without restrictions. 
520 |a The Parrish and Pemberton families were wealthy Quaker merchants living in Philadelphia during the 18th century. They shared a dedication to several benevolent causes, among them the abolition of slavery, improvement of relations with the Indians, penal reform, and the poor. This collection contains a selection of documents from and pertaining to both families. The Parrish documents focus on several noted family members, principally John Parrish (1728/29-1807), who was a Quaker minister active in promoting good relations with the Indians, and his nephew Dr. Joseph Parrish (1779-1840), a noted Philadelphia physician who was an outspoken abolitionist and crusader for penal reform. The Parrish family documents then follow Joseph Parrish’s sons Dillwyn Parrish (1809-1886), a prominent Philadelphia pharmacist who was also a dedicated abolitionist and crusader for racial equality, and his brother Samuel Parrish (1822-1872), who appears to be largely responsible for gathering much of the Parrish and Pemberton material. Volumes in the collection concern early Quaker settlement and religious concerns, “Visitations to the sick,” (1796) by philanthropist Ann Parrish (1760-1800), Parrish family genealogy, the political and moral writings of Dr. Joseph Parrish, “Sketches and recollections…” of John Cox (1755-1847), father-in-law to Dr. Joseph Parrish, collected source material of Quaker historian Robert Proud (1728-1813), and a slave narrative written by James Carter in 1807. The Pemberton documents focus primarily on brothers Israel Pemberton (1715-1779), James Pemberton (1723-1809) and John Pemberton (1727-1795) in their efforts toward abolition and the improvement of relations with indigenous peoples through the Friendly Association for Regaining and Preserving Peace with the Indians by Pacific Measures during the Seven Years’ War.  
520 |a The Parrish and Pemberton families papers (Collection 1653) consist of two boxes of documents relating to the Parrish and Pemberton families of Philadelphia, wealthy Quaker merchants who shared a dedication to various benevolent causes, notably the abolition of slavery, Indian relations, penal reform, and concern for the poor, especially women. Throughout this collection runs a thread of activism on behalf of the disenfranchised. The collection has been arranged into three series: Series 1 contains Pemberton family documents, largely correspondence, but also papers relating to the Friendly Association for Regaining and Preserving Peace with the Indians, and papers relating to the Society of Friends. Series 2 contains Parrish correspondence and various papers collected by family members, as well as photographs and portraits. Series 3 contains volumes written or transcribed by Parrish family members, as well as several works relating to Quaker history and practice. The Parrish/Pemberton family connection remains unclear. There is no attested relation by marriage evident in the documentation, but there is clear evidence that the two families knew each other well and worked together in the same benevolent organizations. Robert Parrish (1727-1815) was a long-term member of the Friendly Association, organized and directed largely by Israel Pemberton (1715-1779). John Parrish (1728/29-1807), who worked tirelessly on behalf of indigenous peoples, shared his efforts in correspondence with John Pemberton (1727-1795). Samuel Parrish (1830-1889) was a family historian and antiquarian, who had in his possession a large collection of Pemberton correspondence, although not necessarily the documents in this collection.  
524 8 |a Cite as: [Indicate cited item or series here], Parrish and Pemberton families papers (Collection 1653), The Historical Society of Pennsylvania. 
541 1 |a Gift of Anna H. Denniston, 1936. 
544 |a At the Historical Society of Pennsylvania: Cox-Parrish-Wharton papers (Collection 0154) Parrish and Maxfield families photographs (Collection 3713) Dillwyn Parrish diary (Collection Am .11115) John Parrish diaries (Collection Am .565) Pemberton family papers (Collection 0484A) Friendly Association minutes (Collection Am .525) Some chapters in the history of the Friendly Association (extra illustrated books) by Samuel Parrish (Collection Ap .877.P26) At other institutions: Parrish family papers, 1780-1966 (Collection RG5/229), Friends Historical Collection of Swarthmore College, Swarthmore, Pennsylvania  
545 |a Parrish Family The Parrish family were prominent Philadelphia Quakers, who previously lived in Maryland near Baltimore. They were descendants of Captain Edward Parrish (1600-1679) who served as surveyor general of the Province of Maryland and was therefore able to acquire extensive land holdings in the region, although many later Parrishes were merchants or physicians. Edward’s great-grandson John Parrish (1698-1745) married Elizabeth Roberts (1705-1745). When both John and Elizabeth died in the same year, one of their sons, John Parrish (1728/29-1807), being left an orphan at still a young age, moved to Philadelphia where he became apprenticed to learn a trade. He married Ann Wilson in 1753, and together they had several children. Throughout his life, John Parrish became increasingly concerned with slavery and the colonists' unfair policies toward Indians. His interest in the condition of Native Americans was heightened during a trip among the Indians of western Pennsylvania in 1773. In 1777 he received a call to the ministry. Thereafter he devoted the rest of his life to a series of benevolent causes, including emancipation, Indian relations, and penal reform. He was present at the signing of treaties with the Indians of western New York in 1793, which he related in a letter to his friend and supporter John Pemberton (1727-1795) in August of that year. In 1784 he served as a missionary carrying the Gospel to the island of Barbados. The last years of his life were increasingly devoted to concerns over abolition. In 1806, shortly before his death, he published the pamphlet, Address to the citizens of the United States…such as hold the black people in bondage. John Parrish (1698-1745) had several other children, among then Robert Parrish (1727-1815), who was active in the Friendly Association for Regaining and Preserving Peace with the Indians by Pacific Measures, an organization dedicated to ending Indian attacks in western Pennsylvania due to grievances over the loss of land during the Seven Years’ War. Another son of John Parish (1698-1745) was Isaac Parrish (1734-1826), who married Sarah Mitchell (1739-1825). Among their children were Joseph Parrish (1779-1840) and Ann (or Anne) Parrish (1760-1800). Joseph became a well-known physician in Philadelphia, who also devoted himself to a variety of benevolent causes, notably penal reform and the abolition of slavery. Dr. Joseph Parrish distinguished himself during the yellow fever epidemic of 1793. When parents Isaac and Sarah fell victim to the epidemic, it was said that his sister Ann Parrish vowed to devote her life to charitable works if they survived; they did, and Ann became a well-known philanthropist who founded the House of Industry, supplying work to poor women in Philadelphia, and the Aimwell School for needy girls. Joseph married Susan (or Susannah) Cox (1788-1851), daughter of John Cox (1755-1847) and Ann Dillwyn (1755-1797). John Cox was a preacher in the Society of Friends and devoted much of his life toward maintaining peaceful relations with the Indians. He and Ann lived at an estate called “Oxmead” in Burlington County, New Jersey. Among the children of Joseph and Susan Parrish were Dillwyn Parrish (1809-1886), Edward Parrish (1822-1872) and Samuel Parrish (1830-1889). Dillwyn Parrish became a pharmacist and was for many years president of the College of Pharmacy. He also served as president of the Pennsylvania Abolition Society from 1851 to 1886, a position that had also been held by his father, Dr. Joseph Parrish. Dillwyn was one of the founders of the Orthopaedic Hospital and the Women’s Medical College. In later life he was active in the Society of Friends as overseer, elder and clerk. He was married twice, to Elizabeth Thomas and later Susanna Maxfield (1841-1884). His brother Edward Parrish (1822-1872) was one of the founders and first president of Swarthmore College, and his great-grandson was the painter Maxfield Parrish. Samuel Parrish (1830-1889) was a literary and antiquarian enthusiast, spending many years collecting letters and documents relating to the early Quakers in Pennsylvania, including family histories and correspondence of the Cox, Parrish and Pemberton families. Samuel, his brother Dillwyn and their niece Susannah Parrish Wharton (1852-1928), all shared in preserving and publishing Parrish family history. Pemberton Family The Pemberton family were wealthy Quaker merchants who devoted their lives to benevolent and charitable work. Phineas Pemberton (1650-1702) came to America in 1682, where he purchased an estate on the Delaware River at Grove Place in Bucks County known as Bolton Farm. Phineas’ son Israel Pemberton (1684-1754) moved to Philadelphia, where he became a highly successful merchant and was active in the Society of Friends. He owned a house at Front and Market Streets, and by 1738 a large estate called “Evergreens” in the southwestern part of the city, about where Pemberton Street now joins Grays Ferry Avenue. Israel Pemberton (1684-1754) married Rachel Read in 1765, and together they had several children, among them Israel Pemberton (1715-1779), James Pemberton (1723-1809) and John Pemberton (1727-1795). Son Israel became a successful merchant and was active within the Society of Friends and in civic life. He was known both as “King of Quakers” and as “King Wampum,” because of his affection and concern for the indigenous population. This concern caused him to resign from the Provincial Assembly in 1756 when war was declared on the Delaware Indians. He then became a leading force within the Friendly Association for Regaining and Preserving Peace with the Indians by Pacific Measures. The Friendly Association was largely organized and directed by Israel Pemberton and his two brothers. During the American Revolution the Pemberton brothers, as pacifists, refused to take up arms or take the oath of allegiance to Pennsylvania, for which they were exiled to Winchester, Virginia, where Israel died in 1779. Israel was twice married, first to Sarah Kirkbride in 1737, and when Sarah died in 1746, to Mary (Stanbury), the widow of Robert Jordan in 1747. Israel had children from both marriages. His grandson, John C. Pemberton (1814-1881) was lieutenant-general in the Confederate army during the Civil War and commanding officer at the fall of Vicksburg in 1863. James Pemberton (1723-1809), also a successful merchant, was a founder and member of the Pennsylvania Hospital and of the Pennsylvania Abolition Society. He inherited both the “Evergreens” estate and the Bolton Farm in Bucks County. James married Hannah Lloyd in 1751. Among their children was Rachel Pemberton (1754-1786), who later married Dr. Thomas Parke (died 1835). John Pemberton (1727-1795) was also a merchant, and was active in causes related to native peoples and the abolition of slavery. Like his brother Israel, he resigned from the Pennsylvania Assembly in 1756. He became president of the Pennsylvania Abolition Society in 1790. As a Quaker missionary, he preached extensively throughout Europe. He married Hannah Zane in 1766, but they remained childless. John later died while preaching in Europe.  
555 |a Finding Aid Available Online:  
600 1 7 |a Carter, James.  |2 Local Sources 
600 1 7 |a Cox, John  |d 1754/55-1847.  |2 Local Sources 
600 1 7 |a Parke, Thomas  |d 1749-1835.  |2 NACO Authority File 
600 1 7 |a Parrish, Anne  |d 1760-1800.  |2 NACO Authority File 
600 1 7 |a Parrish, Dillwyn  |d 1809-1886.  |2 NACO Authority File 
600 1 7 |a Parrish, John  |d 1729-1807.  |2 NACO Authority File 
600 1 7 |a Parrish, Joseph  |d 1779-1840.  |2 NACO Authority File 
600 1 7 |a Parrish, Samuel  |d 1830-1889.  |2 Local Sources 
600 1 7 |a Parrish, Susannah Cox  |d 1788-1851.  |2 NACO Authority File 
600 1 7 |a Pemberton, Israel  |d 1715-1779.  |2 NACO Authority File 
600 1 7 |a Pemberton, James  |d 1723-1809.  |2 NACO Authority File 
600 1 7 |a Pemberton, John.  |d 1727-1795  |2 NACO Authority File 
600 1 7 |a Penn, William  |d 1644-1718.  |2 NACO Authority File 
600 1 7 |a Proud, Robert  |d 1728-1813.  |2 NACO Authority File 
600 1 7 |a Scott, Abraham.  |2 NACO Authority File 
600 1 7 |a Vaux, Richard  |d 1751-1790.  |2 Local Sources 
650 0 |a Friendly Association for Regaining and Preserving Peace with the Indians by Pacific Measures 
650 7 |a Quakers--Abolition--18th century.  |2 Local sources 
650 7 |a Quakers--Indian Relations--18th century  |2 Local sources 
650 7 |a Quakers--Philadelphia--18th century  |2 Local sources 
655 0 |a Slave narratives 
700 3 |a Pemberton family  |e creator 
852 |a The Historical Society of Pennsylvania  |b Parrish and Pemberton Families Papers  |l 1653 
856 4 2 |y Link to finding aid  |u http://www2.hsp.org/collections/manuscripts/p/Parrish1653.html