Philadelphia voter registration photographs, 1939

Philadelphia Registration
Tenderloin Flophouse
The Tenderloin, part of Philadelphia's notorious red-light district in the 1920s-1930s, a quarter-mile square area in center-city, attracted the dregs of Philadelphia society, its homeless, drug addicts, and prostitutes. The Prospec...

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Bibliographic Details
Collection:Philadelphia Record photograph morgue (#V07)
Date:1939-10-05, 1939-10-06
Dimensions:20 x 25 cm
26 x 20 cm
Folder Number:Folder 3424
Format: Electronic
Subjects and Genres:
Copyright:Please contact Historical Society of Pennsylvania Rights and Reproductions (rnr@hsp.org)
Online Access:https://digitallibrary.hsp.org/index.php/Detail/objects/12980
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Summary: Philadelphia Registration
Tenderloin Flophouse
The Tenderloin, part of Philadelphia's notorious red-light district in the 1920s-1930s, a quarter-mile square area in center-city, attracted the dregs of Philadelphia society, its homeless, drug addicts, and prostitutes. The Prospect Hotel, or the Weingrad Hotel under the ownership of Leon Weingrad, was a "flophouse," or a place of cheap lodging and minimal amenities, that in 1930 housed over 70 individuals. Albert Weingrad, the older brother of Leon, was an "inspector of voting registration," meaning he was responsible for ensuring honesty and equality during the voting process.

Philadelphia Registration
Going Up? Citizens Seeking Right to Vote
Post-Roosevelt's New Deal, more citizens were becoming registered to vote, and political party affiliations were shifting in favor of the Democrats, particularly among Black voters, but a Democrat had yet to hold office in the twentieth century. During the 1939 Mayoralty election, members of the Democratic party believed Blacks voting Republican were the cause of failure in the Democratic candidate being elected into office. The numbers of registered voters was steady increasing since the late 1920s, and Republican candidate Robert Eneas Lamberton pulled in the victory with 398,384 votes.