Lucretia Mott

Lucretia Mott at the age of 49 (1842), at the [[National Portrait Gallery (United States)|National Portrait Gallery]] in [[Washington, D.C.]] Lucretia Mott (née Coffin; January 3, 1793 – November 11, 1880) was a U.S. Quaker, abolitionist, women's rights activist, and social reformer. She had formed the idea of reforming the position of women in society when she was amongst the women excluded from the World Anti-Slavery Convention in 1840. In 1848 she was invited by Jane Hunt to a meeting that led to the first meeting about women's rights. Mott helped write the Declaration of Sentiments during the 1848 Seneca Falls Convention.

Her speaking abilities made her an important abolitionist, feminist, and reformer. When slavery was outlawed in 1865, she advocated giving former slaves who had been bound to slavery laws within the boundaries of the United States, whether male or female, the right to vote. She remained a central figure in the abolition and suffrage movement until her death in 1880.

Mott was a Quaker preacher early in her adulthood. Provided by Wikipedia
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Author: Mott, Lucretia, 1793-1880.
Published 1850
Record Source: Published Materials
Book
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Author: Mott, Lucretia, 1793-1880.
Published 2002
Record Source: Published Materials
Book